Got GERD? Learn to Balance Body Acid Naturally

By Elizabeth Kahn, Dietitian

The foods we eat contribute directly to the pH balance in our bodies. If the acid levels in our diet are out of balance, health problems will often occur. Problems associated with high acidity include acid reflux, GERD and indigestion. Acidic environments are also linked to cancer and other diseases.

Acidic foods are highly prevalent in the average American diet. These foods need to be consumed in balance with more basic (alkaline) foods to keep the body chemistry in line. Use the following list to help balance your body chemistry naturally.

Highly Acidic Foods (avoid):

Alcohol, asparagus, beans, Brussels sprouts, buckwheat, catsup, chickpeas (garbanzo beans), cocoa, coffee, cornstarch, cranberries, eggs, fish, flour based products, legumes, lentils, meat, milk, mustard, noodles, oatmeal, olives, organ meats, pasta, pepper, plums, poultry, prunes, sauerkraut, shellfish, soft drinks, sugar, all foods with added sugar, tea and vinegar. Also aspirin, tobacco and most drugs.

Moderately Acidic Foods (limit):

Butter, canned or glazed fruit, cheeses, dried coconut, dried or sulfured fruit (most), grains (most), ice cream, ice milk, lamb’s quarters, nuts and seeds (most).

Highly Basic Foods (consume liberally):

Avocados, corn, dates, fresh coconut, fresh fruits (most- even citrus), fresh vegetables (most- especially kudzu, onions, potatoes, rutabagas), honey, horseradish, maple syrup, molasses, mushrooms, onions, raisins, soy products, sprouts, Umeboshi plums and watercress.

Moderately Basic Foods (consume liberally):

Almonds, blackstrap molasses, brazil nuts, chestnuts, lima beans, millet and soured dairy products.

Resources:

Balch, P. A. (2006). Prescription for nutritional healing. Avery Publishing: New York.