Food Allergies and How to Deal

Alternative Lasagna.

Like many people, I have battled with food allergies. This is one reason I became a Dietitian. Years ago, I was having symptoms partially caused by food allergies, which were discovered by a nutritionist. Though I was never officially tested, we were able to pinpoint the main culprits (cows milk and gluten) and I was able to fix most of the problems I was experiencing. After an elimination process and reworking my diet, I was even able to eat gluten again. This was very effective – effective enough for me to go back to school and study nutrition – and has been working for me for the most part ever since. However, as often happens with our health and diet, my diet is in need of some re-tooling.

It is worth noting that food allergies can be triggered by stress. Which was the case with me, then and now. Also, once you have food allergies you are more prone to getting them and should eat foods on a rotation diet, not consume any food too frequently, and manage stress.

Recently, in response to symptoms I was experiencing, I was tested for food allergies. The test came back positive. It showed I have allergies to gluten, bananas, cucumber, onion, garlic, avocado, eggs, beef, lamb and cod fish. Wow!

My body is reacting differently to all of these foods. For example, I am barely allergic to cucumbers, but severely allergic to eggs, which I knew based on my body’s response to eggs. So now, I am once again doing an elimination diet (wish me luck), and am taking enzyme and probiotic supplements to help purge the residual allergens and reset the system.

This process has been at times frustrating but mostly empowering. Empowering, because I believe in knowing why our bodies are acting a certain way. I am not a fan of just taking a pill or pills, suffering and eventually removing the body part that is in trouble, in this case my colon or intestine.

So, now, what to eat? As many people know this can be a difficult and frustrating process. Like many people on special diets, I had to figure it out- again.

During this “adventure”, I made vegan, gluten-free “lasagna” style pasta. It was delicious! I have included pictures as well as a link to a recipe similar to the one I based mine on.

I used a bottle of organic pasta sauce, which included the hopefully temporary allergen; garlic. But, this was the best I could do on this particular day. I substituted gluten-free lentil pasta for regular lasagna noodles, which usually have gluten.

The elimination diet should be tricky, but ultimately rewarding, as my digestive issues will hopefully improve and I will once again be able to eat many of the foods I am currently reacting to.

I will have to take this one step at a time, do my best, try to minimize frustration, and be patient. In the process, I will hopefully not be excessively hungry, as I figure out what to eat for each meal.

During the first elimination diet years ago, I stared into the cupboard in tears, hungry and frustrated. Hopefully, the second time around, my Dietetic training and experience will make the trip much smoother. I am confident the outcome, as before, will be worth every second of effort. After all it is why I get up every morning and do what I do…..because this stuff works!

I will keep you updated. In the meantime, here’s to us all plugging away, paying attention, asking questions, being enlightened and working to achieve optimum health! Be well. Cheers.

A Nutrition Revolution offers personalized nutrition counseling to families and individuals, via email, phone and/or video chat. Contact us so you can achieve your health goals and live your best life! And check out the book: A Nutrition Revolution!

Tips for a Healthy New Year

DSC_0203Happy Holidays!

Many people are wondering how to achieve the goal of good health, especially at times like this, as we prepare to bring in the New Year.

I  recommend a couple of resources to help you do that.

I recently came across a program on Public Television and was inspired and impressed by Dr. Robert Lustig, an endocrinologist with UCSF. On this program, Dr. Lustig succinctly explains the physiological effects of processed and other unhealthy foods, and discusses the food and drug industries and their monetary motivations to keep you unhealthy.

In the same vein as Dr. Lustig’s work, my book, A Nutrition Revolution: Uncover the Mysteries of Nutrition, discusses nutrition and how we are being set up for continual failure by the food, drug and other industries, and our weakening societal systems. It takes the reader down the path of healing that I went on, discusses the essentials of proper nutrition and how we can get our political, economic, health and education systems out of the perpetual cycles of failure they are currently in, and all of us back to wellness. The cure for most problems today is awareness; as knowledge is power.

So give and receive the gift of enlightenment this holiday season, and share information needed to create good health for you, someone you love, and for the world.

Have a happy, healthy New Year.

http://anutritionrevolution.com/the-book/

http://blogs.kqed.org/bayareabites/2014/08/06/sweet-revenge-dr-robert-lustig-explains-how-to-cut-sugar-lose-weight-and-turn-the-tables-on-processed-foods/

How to Get Nutrition Consulting Paid for by Insurance

Nutrition therapy can be a helpful component in medical therapy, but often it is not covered by insurance. It cannot only improve an individual’s health, but it also can save money on health-care costs. According to a report by the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine (IOM), getting nutritional therapy is cost effective. Dietitians can help people manage conditions such as high-blood pressure, high cholesterol, kidney and heart problems and diabetes. A study by the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Long Beach, Calif., showed that more than half the people who saw a dietitian only a few times lowered their cholesterol so much that they no longer needed cholesterol medication. Nutrition therapy saved the health-care system about $60,000 per year in prescription drug costs. According to the IOM report, nutrition therapy can mean a savings of millions of dollars. For example, if Medicare beneficiaries with high-blood pressure received nutrition therapy, health-care costs over a five-year period could be cut by an estimated $52 million dollars. These cost savings could be increased for every disease nutrition therapy was applied to. The IOM report’s authors concluded that Medicare should cover nutrition counseling. Unfortunately, most insurance companies do not cover nutrition counseling but, fortunately, more and more insurance carriers are now seeing the advantages of seeing a nutritionist (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=50695&pf=3&page=1).

Difficulty:
Moderately Easy

Instructions

Things You’ll Need

  • Phone
  • Computer
  • Insurance company information
  • Doctor’s contact information
  1. How to Get Insurance Coverage for Nutrition Counseling

    • 1

      Insurance may be more likely to cover nutrition therapy for certain medical conditions such as diabetes, obesity, coronary artery disease or high-blood pressure for which diet therapy and modification is recognized as one aspect of treatment (Dr.Weil.com, http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA400314/nutritional-consultations).

    • 2

      First call or see your doctor to see if you can get a referral for a dietitian. This will increase the likelihood nutrition therapy will be covered by insurance.

    • 3

      Call, go online to the insurance companies website or email your insurance provider to find out what coverage they offer for nutrition counseling. Some insurance companies might cover it entirely and some might offer a 10 to 20 percent discount.

    • 4

      A good bet for getting nutrition visits covered by insurance is to see a registered dietitian. You can contact the American Dietetic Association’s Nutrition Network Referral Service at (800) 366-1655 (weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Central Standard Time) for contact information for dietitians in your area ( http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=50695&pf=3&page=1).

    • 5

      Even if your insurer says your policy doesn’t cover dietary counseling, send in the paperwork anyway and see what happens. If you have a doctor’s written referral to a dietitian, include a copy. Also include a letter, signed by both your dietitian and your doctor, detailing the medical need for your treatment.
      In correspondence refer to dietitian visits as “medical nutrition therapy” or nutrition “management” or “treatment.” Try to avoid the term counseling as it does not imply a medical necessity.

    • 6

      Instead of speaking with an adjuster, ask your dietitian to talk to the medical director of the health plan to consider covering nutritional counseling, says Michele Mathieu, Director of Health Care Financing at the American Dietetic Association.

    • 7

      Emphasize the dollar savings. Have your dietitian, doctor or both detail the progress you have been  making and how much money is being saved as a result. For instance, if you have lost weight or been able to reduce medication, explain this to them. Add up the actual dollars that have been saved. Many insurance companies are demanding to see actual results from dietitian visits before they will begin to cover them. They might start authorizing them if they see progress is being made.

    • 8

      Be persistent. Even if your claims are rejected, continue to submit them after every visit, especially if you are getting better. If you are persistent you are more likely than not to get it. Even if you do not receive insurance coverage, you will be making the insurance company aware of the effectiveness of nutrition, and with each claim filed, you will have cast a vote for insurance coverage for nutrition therapy.

 

Resources

 

Anxiety and Natural Healing

By Elizabeth Kahn, Dietitian

It is estimated that ten to twenty percent of the population will have a panic attack at least once during their lifetimes. Anxiety can either be chronic or acute. A panic attack is acute anxiety. Panic attacks are a nervous system response also referred to as the “Fight or Flight” response. The fight or flight response is the body’s reaction to a stressful situation, in which hormones including adrenaline are released. In a panic attack this response occurs at an inappropriate time. In the face of a wild animal this response can save you, in an inappropriate situation this can produce unnecessary stress. Anxiety can be uncomfortable and also takes a toll on the body.

During a panic attack there can be feelings of impending doom, shortness of breath, a smothering or claustrophobic feeling, heart palpitations, chest pain, dizziness, hot flashes and/or chills, sweating, trembling, numbness, tingling sensations in the extremities, a feeling of not being in reality and a distorted perception of time passing.

Long term anxiety can cause muscle soreness, twitching and tightening as well as fatigue, depression, insomnia, nightmares, decreased libido and an inability to relax.

Chronic anxiety is more mild and generalized than acute. Sufferers often feel a vague sense of anxiety much of the time. These individuals may also suffer an anxiety attack but generally the feelings are less intense. They may experience headaches, chronic fatigue and startle easily and often have a persistent feeling of uneasiness, especially around other people.

Diet

Nutrition can reduce the number and intensity of panic attacks and overall anxiety. Following a natural plan can either end the need for medication or make it possible to reduce drug dosage.

Nutritional deficiencies including low selenium, iron and chromium levels can cause anxiety. Food allergies can also trigger these disorders.

Food that are helpful for anxiety are apricots, asparagus, avocados, bananas, broccoli, blackstrap molasses, brewer’s yeast, brown rice, dried fruits, dulse, figs, fish (especially salmon), garlic, green leafy vegetables, legumes, raw nuts and seeds, soy products, whole grains and yogurt.

Eat small frequent meals rather than fewer larger meals, i.e. five meals rather than three. Limit intake of animal protein and eat more complex carbohydrates and plant proteins. Avoid foods that have refined sugars or other simple carbohydrates. For maximum nutritional benefits avoid all simple sugars, carbonated soft drinks, alcohol and tobacco.

Caffeine can trigger anxiety. Determine if caffeine is affecting you by keeping a food log of your intake while noting your anxiety levels, or simply limit or avoid the substance altogether. Coffee, black tea, chocolate and many cola’s contain caffeine.

Herbal Treatment

Kava kava is an herb that can treat anxiety. Kava or most any herb should not be taken for more than two weeks at a time. Catnip, chamomile, cramp bark, hops, linden flower, motherwort, passion flower and skullcap can also aid in preventing panic attacks and promote relaxation.

Fennel, lemon balm and willow bark reduce gastrointestinal upsets caused by anxiety. Feverfew and meadowsweet can relieve anxiety related headaches. Meadowsweet can be taken as a tea or extract. Check with your local health food store for more information on availability and ideal ways to take individual herbs, as staff in these locales are often very knowledgeable.

If you are taking medication consult your doctor or pharmacist before taking any herb to check for possible drug interactions.

Other Causes

Recreational drug use such as marijuana use can cause anxiety attacks.

More Natural Treatments

Meditation and exercise are effective tools to alleviate anxiety. Call a trusted friend to talk as this can also diffuse anxiety. Positive thinking can be very helpful for this and just about any other mental or physical issue.

According to famed author and motivational speaker Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, “whenever a negative thought concerning your personal powers comes to mind, deliberately voice a positive thought to cancel it out”. This and other tools for positive thinking can reduce the feelings of stress or anxiety dramatically. Stress is, after all, in the eye of the perceiver.

As I often do, I recommend a naturopathic doctor to analyze an individual’s needs and develop a customized treatment plan for those suffering from anxiety disorders. Look for one of these practitioners in the phone book or on the Internet, and contact them one by one until you find a good fit for your situation. These practitioners can often refer you to the appropriate provider if they are not the best match for you, as many naturopaths have specific areas of expertise. Some natural practitioners accept insurance and some insurance plans will help cover naturopathic treatment. However, if you have to (and can) pay out of your own pocket for natural medicine, solving the underlying problem will be well worth the expense.

Sources

Balch, P. A. (2006). Prescription for nutritional healing (4th ed.). New York: Avery Publishing.

Peale, N. V. (1992). The power of positive thinking. New York: Simon & Schuster. Retrieved October 30, 2011, from http://self-improvement-ebooks.com/books/tpopt.php.

 

 

Ofelia’s Kitchen and A Nutrition Revolution

Local Business Owner’s Team Up to Inspire Health

By Elizabeth Kahn

Ofelia’s Kitchen in Livermore is an independently owned and operated restaurant that serves healthy, homemade meals using fresh, local, organic ingredients.

Ofelia Gomez and her husband, Jay Gomez came to the United States from Columbia in 1985. They arrived in California in 1995 and soon after opened Ofelia’s Kitchen. Jay worked for many years in the Silicon Valley until an economic downturn took his job, and he now happily spends more time at the restaurant. The Gomez’s decided to open the restaurant after being encouraged by Ofelia’s friends to share her amazing cooking abilities, and to instill the value of hard work and joy of healthy cooking in their children, Jennifer and Alexander.

Their daughter, Jennifer, is a medic in the U.S. Army and has served in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Their son Alexander graduated from the University of California at San Diego with a degree in International Studies. Alex now works for the UCSD Medical Clinic as a computer database manager.

Ofelia’s serves a variety of salads and sandwiches including chicken, tuna and crab salad, artichoke, eggplant, pastrami and vegetarian meatloaf. Their sandwiches are all served on fresh bread that is baked daily and topped with items like lettuce, sprouts, cucumber and tomatoes. The restaurant offers a variety of smoothies such as a delectable blackberry-banana smoothie and an invigorating green-tea frappe. They make delicious homemade soups, most of which are vegetarian, and include pumpkin, minestrone, chicken noodle, white bean and broccoli.

About Me

I too was inspired and lucky enough to be able to follow my passion, nutrition. I returned to school after being laid off from my high tech job as well, in the same economic downturn that changed Jay’s path. I graduated in 2006 from the University of California at Davis with a Bachelor of Science degree in Clinical Nutrition. I am now a Health educator, author and maintain a private nutrition consulting practice. Ours are stories of making lemon-aide out of lemons- literally!

The Collaboration

I recently had the chance to work with Ofelia’s to analyze the nutritional content of their recipes. During the process, I tasted many of their handcrafted creations and was continually impressed with the quality and taste. I was inspired by the fresh ingredients—and love—they incorporate into every one of their dishes.

I will be offering nutrition talks and signing my new book A Nutrition Revolution: Uncover the Mysteries of Nutrition at Ofelia’s soon. During the presentations Ofelia will offer tastings of some of their fabulous food. Look for the schedule at Ofelia’s and on my website.

If you have a chance in the meantime, do visit Ofelia’s for a healthy, heart-warming meal. And we hope to see you at the talk and tastings!

Ofelia’s is located on Hillcrest Avenue in Livermore off of East Avenue. They are open Monday through Friday from 10:30-5:30, and Saturday from 11-4:30. You can visit them online at: http://ofeliaskitchen.com.

Beth Kahn is a Dietitian, educator, and author of A Nutrition Revolution: Uncover the Mysteries of Nutrition. For more information or to connect with Beth visit: anutritionrevolution.com.

 

Press Release: “A Nutrition Revolution: Uncover the Mysteries of Nutrition” is Published by AuthorHouse

By CLK Photography

For Immediate Release

October 1st, 2011

Want to know the real secret of how to heal your body and remain healthier and why it seems so difficult to get the traditional establishment to accept alternative, complementary and natural medical or health care treatments—let alone a trip to the nutritionist? In A Nutrition Revolution, Elizabeth Kahn reveals why Americans are kept in the dark about the benefits of good nutrition—eating well can heal your ills without the need for doctors or medicine. Additionally she offers information on how to use alternative, complementary and natural health care for healing and achieving better health while encouraging consumers to instigate change in America’s infrastructure so it becomes easier to attain sustainable good health.

Not another “how to” diet book or “healthy eating” book, A Nutrition Revolution provides a “how-to-understand-nutrition” book that asks readers to make a philosophical shift in their approach to medical and health care, dieting, eating, and food shopping. In a personal, comprehensible and compelling manner, Kahn points out that learning to eat in a healthy manner shows the way not only to a healthy body and lifestyle but, in many cases, to healing. The author helps readers see the real barriers to nutrition, health care and natural healing alternatives so they can overcome them.

By educating readers about the misleading information they receive from food manufacturers, drug corporations, doctors, politicians, and the diet industry, Kahn shines a spotlight on what makes it so difficult for most people to integrate nutrition into typical medical treatment. Additionally, A Nutrition Revolution provides readers with problem-solving methods to implement in doctors’ offices, grocery stores, homes, schools, and voting booths so they can create the necessary shifts in consciousness, attitudes and priorities on both a local and national level. Kahn encourages all consumers to influence how those in power affect the delivery of healthy products and services today and in the future, thus creating a revolution in America’s current approach to nutrition.

Jon Erlandson, founder of Healthy Food in Schools, says A Nutrition Revolution “is a very perceptive and thorough analysis of not just our American diet but the pharma[ceutical], food and education industries as well. This should be required reading for all school district decision makers…This message is too important to let it go unnoticed.”

A visit to a nutritionist made Kahn realize she could eliminate the symptoms of her lactose intolerance, rid herself of borderline hypoglycemia, heal her early-stage thyroid problems, and prevent herself from getting diabetes—all simply by eating a balanced diet. Had she instead “followed the doctor’s orders” and taken prescription medication, the affects of her lactose intolerance, continued intake of processed foods, and long-term lack of proper nutrition would have taken a toll on her body. Kahn’s paradigm shift set her on a new path, and she became a nutrition consultant and educator as well as an advocate for changing not only how people approach their own health care but how they view food manufacturers, school cafeterias, pharmaceutical companies, and the political, economic and educational systems in our country.

“Healthy food, nutrition therapy and nutrition education can eliminate 80 percent of our disorders,” claims Kahn. “And we can treat many of the disorders we have, even autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), with good nutrition. However, accomplishing this requires educating consumers’, doctors’ and politicians’ about the value of good nutrition and natural health alternatives.”

Those consumers who can or want to influence public policy will find A Nutrition Revolution of particular interest. “For those who know, deep down, there has to be a better way, this book is for you. It will take a lot of people standing up to their doctors and insurance companies saying, ‘I want a nutritionist,’ and demanding healthy food in stores to create the needed change. I hope my book will create a desire in people to stand up for themselves and for their needs.”

In the foreword to A Nutrition Revolution, Jaime L. Mitchell, publisher and owner of Natural Awakenings Magazine, writes, “Elizabeth Kahn is at the forefront of a paradigm shift: a re-shifting of focus toward root causes like nutrition and education. If you are a parent, an educator, or even a policy maker, this book is a must-read for you to empower yourselves, your children, your students, and your community.”

For more information on A Nutrition Revolution or on the author, please visit the author’s website at www.anutritionrevolution.com. To purchase a copy of the book, go to http://bookstore.authorhouse.com.

For more information:

fill out our contact form here.

Holistic Nutrition

By Elizabeth Kahn, Dietitian
A healthy offering
Credit: Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of D. Sharon Pruitt

Holistic nutritionists treat the whole individual with natural remedies. These practitioners can alleviate symptoms of and prevent disease by using natural remedies such as diet and exercise. Modern medicine sets out to treat symptoms of disease as doctors often do not understand a cause. Many disorders and diseases such as ADD and diabetes are caused by poor diet. Many holistic nutritionists believe that many of today’s diseases are being caused by undiagnosed nutritional imbalances. Holistic practitioners attempt to heal people by giving the body what it needs to heal itself and by correcting any nutrient deficiencies. Holistic nutrition is often used in conjunction with modern medicine. This multifaceted approach to health care that incorporates mainstream medicine with natural treatments is called integrative medicine. Many practitioners of all walks, believe that integrative medicine is the future of health care.

How Nutrition Works

Healthy food
Credit: Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Rene Ehrhardt

Natural treatments like holistic nutrition attempt to stimulate the body’s natural defenses and immune system in order for the body to heal itself. Many people in our society now have a poor diet due to the consumption of highly processed, refined foods. Nutritional imbalances can often be at the root of many of today’s diseases as a result. Holistic nutrition therapy can often cure many of today’s health problems by evaluating the diet and nutrient balance in the body. Holistic nutritionists work with the client to alter their food and drink intake and exercise to adjust nutrient balance and put the body into a more balanced, nourished and whole state.

Types of Holistic Practitioners

Integrated medicine: A team approach to health
Credit: Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Pop!Tech

There are many natural practitioners in addition to holistic nutritionists that can often benefit health by using a holistic, or whole approach. Examples of holistic practitioners include acupuncturists, general holistic medical, chiropractors and herbalists. In integrated medicine, all of these practitioners work together in a team approach to treat the patient by using all available therapies. As in mainstream Western medicine, in integrated medicine a primary-care physician would recommend the treatment and could include many of these complementary therapies. Holistic nutrition and other natural practitioners along with Western medicine can be a powerful team approach to healing.

Health Literacy

Many people do not have a basic knowledge about health, and this includes nutrition. According to the 2003 study, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that millions of people in the United States lack basic health literacy. Health literacy is defined as the degree to which individuals can obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.

Lack of Information Leads to the Need for More Natural Healing

Empty chair and desk
Credit: Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Alex

The people who lack basic health knowledge have misinformation about the body and disease and then often don’t make the connection between lifestyle choices like diet and disease. According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy study, only 11 percent of those studied had a proficient health literacy. Proficient in health literacy includes skills like calculating cholesterol and blood-sugar levels and understanding nutrition labels. With so many people lacking in nutrition knowledge, there is an even greater need for holistic nutritionists that can teach them about proper nutrition and their health.

Better than Drugs or Surgery

No more pills!
Credit: Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Shutr

Natural remedies like holistic nutrition do not cause dramatic side effects like pharmaceutical solutions do. Surgery removes body parts after they have broken down. Since natural solutions can prevent disease and alleviate symptoms without side effects, they are therefore preferable to drugs or surgery. Nutrition has a regenerative and healing effect on the body and its organs and can often make drugs and surgery unnecessary.

Finding a Good Provider

There are many credential programs that certify these alternative practitioners. When seeking the advice of a holistic nutritionist or other alternative practitioner you should ask for their credentials and verify them and that the institution that gave them to them is a credible one. Many nutritionists are registered dietitians. This means that they completed a four-year bachelor’s degree program, completed an internship, passed the exam and have been registered with the American Dietetic Association. You can also call them for a referral.

Keyword
  • holistic nutrition
  • integrated medicine
  • healing
Reference
Resources

Kahn Publishes New Book on Nutrition | From Natural Awakenings Magazine | July 2011

San Francisco Bay Area resident Elizabeth Kahn will release a new book, A Nutrition Revolution, Uncover the Mysteries of Nutrition, this summer. A University of California–Davis alumna who studied clinical nutrition, Kahn has published many health-based articles and now maintains a private nutrition consulting practice.

Her book reveals why Americans are often kept in the dark about the real benefits of good nutrition, while offering information on how to use nutrition and natural healthcare alternatives for healing and achieving better health. A Nutrition Revolution—what Kahn calls a “how-to-understand nutrition” book—also encourages consumers to instigate change in America’s infrastructure, so it becomes easier for consumers to achieve sustainable good health.

The creation of the book was prompted by a visit to a nutritionist that dramatically improved Kahn’s health and created a paradigm shift for her about eating, healing and health-care. She is now an educator, as well as an advocate for changing not only how people approach their own eating habits and healthcare, but also how they view food manufacturers, school cafeterias, pharmaceutical companies, doctors, insurance companies and the healthcare, political, economic and educational systems in America. “For those who know, deep down, there has to be a better way, this book is for you,” Kahn says.

For more information and to order the book, click here.

 

Example of a Personal Diet Analysis

By Dietitian, Wellness Educator and eHow Contributor, Elizabeth Kahn

A personal diet analysis is where a dietitian or nutritionist evaluates the daily diet of an individual to determine its healthfulness. There are many reasons that diet analysis can be necessary. An individual may have health concerns or problems such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obesity, diabetes and Crohn’s disease. There are many in Western society who would benefit from diet analysis as many of the typical Western diets are out of balance nutritionally and this can cause a host of diseases and other health problems

Software, Online Tools

There are software packages that can be used at home. This would involve the individual entering his or her daily food intake into the computer and allowing it to do the diet analysis. The diet could then be modified and re-entered until the right nutritional content was reached. Many dietitians do this for their patients. The software costs anywhere from $2 each month (online) to $800 for the software dietitians use. There are also free tools for diet analysis, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s tool, MyPyramid.gov.

In-Person Diet Analysis

There are dietitians and nutritionists who do one on one counseling. Many nutritionists
charge under $100 per hour. Thirty to 90 minutes per week for several weeks
(approximately 10 weeks) would be sufficient for most people.

Food Journal

In person, individualized nutrition counseling typically involves the patient or client
keeping a diary or a food journal of what they eat each day. Most food journals
are kept for a few days to a few weeks. The diet is then evaluated for
nutritional content, balance, calories, portion sizes, fat and carbohydrate
intake, etc. The nutrition expert will then review the journal and make suggested
changes to the patient or clients diet.

Example of a Daily Food Diary

Breakfast:

2 eggs

2 tbsp. butter

1 piece white toast

3 cups coffee

Lunch:

1 hamburger

1 large fries

1 large soda

Snack:

1 cup barbecue potato chips

Dinner:

2 cups chicken casserole w/potatoes, cream of chicken soup, cheddar cheese,
onions

1 french roll

Dessert

1 cup chocolate ice cream

Problems

This diet is high in cholesterol, calories and saturated or “bad” fat. This diet
is also high in processed foods including white flour that have many nutrients
such as vitamins, minerals and amino acids removed. As a result, this diet is
also low in fiber. While it does contain a sufficient amount of protein, it
actually contains too much. This diet also contains enough servings of grains but
not enough whole grains as guides like the food pyramid intend. The body
responds similarly to white flour as it does to sugar, so it should be
considered more of a sugar than a grain although it does contain some
nutrients. Sugars and fats have a thin stripe on the food pyramid, meaning we
should limit our intake of those things. This diet is too high in the fats and
sugars and needs more fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Foods like fruits,
vegetables and whole grains contain many important nutrients such as vitamins,
minerals, amino acids and fiber, which this diet and many typical Western diets
are lacking in.

Recommendations

A nutritionist or dietitian would suggest something like the following:

Breakfast:

1 egg

1 tbsp. canola oil margarine

1/2 apple sliced

1 piece whole-grain bread

1 to 2 cups green tea or juice

Lunch:

1 tuna sandwich on whole-grain bread w/lettuce and tomato and 1 tbsp. low-fat
mayonnaise

(or 1 turkey or veggie burger on whole-grain bread with lettuce and tomato,
ketchup and mustard, 1 tsp. mayo if desired)

1/2 cup baked chips

1 glass water or juice

Snack:

1 whole orange or 4 slices of 3-4 inch celery sticks with peanut butter

Dinner:

1 cup chicken casserole with mozzarella cheese, onions, scalloped potatoes,
low-fat milk

1 cup green salad with 1 tbsp. olive oil and vinegar dressing

1 to 2 pieces whole grain bread of their choice (i.e., slices, roll or
baguette)

1 glass water or juice

Dessert: 3/4
cup chocolate frozen yogurt

Explanation of Recommendations

The recommendations made will add many nutrients and will lower the amount of
calories, bad fat and cholesterol. This modified diet is much more balanced and
incorporates the right amount of each food group. There are many ways to modify
an individual’s diet. Personal counseling and interviewing is useful in
determining what types of foods to incorporate into the diet. This diet was
modified by taking the client’s existing choices and making them more
healthful. There are many creative ways to change one’s diet and personal
consulting by a nutrition expert is the ideal method for achieving that and
finding a solution that will last.

Resources

MyPyramid .gov

The American Dietetic Association

Find A Nutrititonist.com

 

Alternative Medicine Treatment for Granuloma Annulare | From eHow.com

By Elizabeth Kahn, Dietitian

Granuloma annulare is a chronic skin condition consisting of raised, reddish or skin-colored bumps that form ring patterns and usually appear on hands and feet. According to the Mayo Clinic, most lesions disappear on their own within a few months to two years. The primary concerns with this skin condition are cosmetic and there are many natural treatments that can speed the disappearance of these lesions.

Diet

You can treat granuloma annulare by trying to build up your immune system and having your body heal itself by getting plenty of sleep, exercise and by eating a healthy diet that includes plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lea protein, fresh juices and taking a multi-vitamin supplement. Many nutrient deficiencies can lead to a lowered immunity and skin problems including granuloma annulare.

Remedies

The regular treatment for granuloma annulare includes freezing or cryotherapy, hydrocortisone and light therapy. If you prefer to look further, there are several alternative medicine formulations available on the market for the treatment of this skin disorder including Annurax, Granutab (herbal) and Garnilin (homeopathic). Of all of these treatments, Granutab is the only one that has been proven effective in a clinical trial.

There are many herbs that can treat skin problems such as oak leaf extract which has healing properties for skin, aloe vera and green tea extract have antioxidant and healing properties, a warm washcloth soaked in malva tea can help inflammation and a poultice made up of chaparral, dandelion and yellow dock root can also benefit a rash.

References

The Mayo Clinic: Granuloma Annulare Definition

Granulomaannulare-options.com: Alternative Medicine Treatment
Options for Granuloma Annulare

Prescription
for Nutritional Healing; Phyllis Balch, James Balch; 2000