An Evolving Natural Healing Journey

Herbs for Gallbladder and Digestion

Like many people, I have battled with digestive issues, and that is what ultimately led me to become a dietitian. Years ago, I experienced symptoms which were caused by food sensitivities and nutritional imbalances. With the help of a dietitian, we discovered I was reacting to cow’s milk and gluten. After an elimination diet and reworking my diet, my symptoms disappeared. This healing process inspired me to return to school and study nutrition so I could share this type of vital, often elusive, nutrition information to help heal others.

After years of being symptom-free, I began to experience digestive issues once again. As in my original journey which I discuss in my books, A Nutrition Revolution and A Nutrition Evolution, I saw many practitioners both conventional and natural and was tested for food sensitivities and allergies, among other things. Tests found no true allergies, but results showed I was having trouble digesting many foods including bananas, cucumbers, onions, garlic, avocadoes, gluten, eggs, beef, lamb, and codfish. Wow! So, once again I did an elimination diet and took enzyme and probiotic supplements to help aid digestion. Unfortunately, unlike the first time around, neither the elimination diet nor the supplements seemed to help.

Elimination diets can be great tools as discoveries are made and health issues can improve when problem foods are found and removed from the diet. However, as I said, this time my symptoms remained. This meant that the root cause of my digestive issues might not be food-related.

As many people know, finding and dealing with root causes of health issues, especially digestive ones, can be a difficult and frustrating process; one that we must often go through alone. Luckily for me, I found knowledgeable and affordable natural healers in both instances. This included my original nutritionist and more recently an acupuncturist/herbalist/nutritionist/kinesiologist to help me through it. But, make no mistake; I was lucky to find them and I had to lead the process.

During a major bout of heartburn, an advice nurse suggested I go to the hospital since heart attack symptoms can mimic those of heartburn. The doctor on shift at the time suggested a gallbladder ultrasound, as well as other tests. Later, I had the ultrasound done and yes, it turned out there was a large gallstone stuck in the neck of my gallbladder which likely caused many, or all, of my digestive issues. The medical staff could not believe I had not experienced more discomfort, and that I hardly knew it was there. As I said, I was experiencing and investigating digestive issues but they were nothing like what most people would experience with a gallstone that size. In fact, the attack happened after eating a turkey “Panini” at a local health food restaurant while researching recipes for a client project I was working on. Although I had smaller bouts of heartburn previously, I was managing them, mostly with alkaline foods. I simply was not used to eating these larger portions of meat, cheese, or white flour and it sent my gallbladder into a tailspin.

Gallstones and fibroids are common in people with high estrogen, according to my naturopathic practitioner. I have also had large fibroids, so high estrogen is possibly the reason for both of these issues.

I am still eating healthfully (and avoiding large doses of those Panini ingredients) and consuming a gallstone appropriate diet; which means smaller meals, continuing with a mostly plant-based diet, and taking herbs. All of this has dramatically improved my symptoms. With the help of a wonderful naturopathic practitioner, I am trying to shrink the gallstone in hopes it will eventually be small enough to pass through with minimal discomfort. This could take time, maybe even a year or more.

I have so far put the surgeon off which is great because I would like to keep my gallbladder and return to optimal digestive health, naturally.

As was the case in my original healing, finding the root cause in our current medical system took time and basically miracles to figure out. Without luck, determination, and knowledge about the power of natural healing, I would not have gotten this far and I do not want this to be the case for anyone, including me.

Natural healing is at times frustrating but also empowering; because figuring out what our bodies are trying to tell us as they behave in a certain way is something we can do and is powerful. Hopefully one day the Healthcare system will evolve into one that includes all practitioners working together to heal root causes so we can all heal naturally and effectively. Healing sources of problems is far superior to unquestioningly taking uber-potent, man-made medicines to treat symptoms, continuing to suffer, and eventually removing body parts.

In the meantime, we must take these healing processes one step at a time, do our best, try to minimize frustration, and be patient. It is also important to be realistic and prepare for difficult moments. During my first elimination diet years ago, I remember staring into the cupboard in tears, hungry, frustrated, and thinking, “I can’t eat anything!” But I carried on, eventually found foods I could eat, and the process was ultimately successful. These experiences led me to this field of work of educating and helping others heal naturally. They have also helped me to help others on their healing journeys; as I have been there too.

So, let us all keep plugging away, asking questions, and seeking enlightenment until we all achieve optimum health!

Beth Kahn offers personalized nutrition counseling in person and via voice or video chat. For more information Contact Us and check out her books “A Nutrition Revolution: Uncover the Mysteries of Nutrition,” and “A Nutrition Evolution: The Revolution Continues.” 

Vegan Goulash – By Beth Kahn, Dietitian

So what to make for dinner? Tonight I answered that question by creating a delicious and simple, vegan dish. Try this easy recipe to enjoy a low-cal, healthy and hearty meal.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup quinoa grain

1 vegan sausage, sliced

1 half onion, sliced

1 teaspoon vegetable oil or non-stick cooking spray

1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce, spices or other flavored sauce

1 portabella mushroom, sliced

1/2 cup frozen peas

Directions: Cook quinoa per instructions and set aside. Blanch frozen peas in hot water. Set aside. Saute onion, mushrooms and sausage in oil or non-stick cooking spray for 2-3 minutes. Add peas, sauce or spices and stir until heated. Add sausage mixture to quinoa. Serve, enjoy and feel and look great! Serves 2.

Note: Many other vegetables can be added in place of peas. For example, try adding fresh spinach or chopped broccoli.

 

Nutritious and Delicious Macaroni and Cheese

By Dietitian and Wellness Educator, Elizabeth Kahn

Try this recipe I adapted from the “Homemade Mac and Cheese” recipe from All Recipes.com. This recipe has less fat and calories and more protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals than the original, and is delicious!

Healthy Homemade Mac and Cheese

Ingredients:

8 ounces uncooked whole-wheat, rice or quinoa elbow macaroni

1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

1 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

3 cups unsweetened plant milk

1/4 cup all natural plant-based margarine

2 1/2 tablespoons whole-wheat or alternative grain flour

2 tablespoons all natural plant-based margarine

1/2 cup whole wheat or panko bread crumbs

1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon Paprika (see note*)

Directions: 1. Cook macaroni according to the package directions. Drain. 2. In a saucepan, melt margarine over medium heat. Stir in enough flour to make a roux. Add milk to roux slowly, stirring constantly. Stir in cheeses, and cook over low heat until cheese is melted and the sauce is a little thick.* Put macaroni in large casserole dish, and pour sauce over macaroni. Stir well. 3. Melt margarine in a skillet over medium heat. Add breadcrumbs and brown. Spread over the macaroni and cheese to cover. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon paprika. 4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Serve. Makes 4 servings.

*You can add rest of paprika at this point (see step 2) for a more golden, yellow color.

Adapted from: Homemade Mac and Cheese. All Recipes. Retrieved 4/20/2012 from, http://allrecipes.com/Recipe-Tools/Print/Recipe.aspx?RecipeID=11679&origin=detail&&Servings=4.